Ratatouille with couscous; a bit of a vegetable stew

Ratatouille is a rich, vegetable stew that originates from the Provence region of France.

This hearty dish tastes wonderful on a cold winter evening and is really easy to make.

Traditionally ratatouille is eaten with crusty bread or rice; I served my version with couscous as its fluffy texture is perfect for soaking up the thick sauce.

Most recipes also add chopped aubergine – I am not a fan and therefore omitted it from mine – but if it tickles your fancy, add some at the beginning with the rest of the veg.

Ingredients

IMG_0750

Ratatouille with couscous

Recipe serves 2-4 (depending on how hungry you are)

  • 1 red onion
  • 1 courgette
  • 2 red peppers
  • 500 grams passatta
  • 10 -12 basil leaves
  • 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 1 tsp dried herbs de Provence
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp each of black pepper and sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 50 grams couscous per person

Method

  • Finely slice the onion, chop the courgette and peppers into chunks. Pre-heat the oven to 200 degrees.
  • In a large casserole dish fry off the vegetables and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  • Roughly chop the basil leaves and set aside until later. Finely slice the stalks and add to the vegetable mixture.
  • When the vegetables are golden and softened, stir in the passata, balsamic vinegar and sugar.
  • Cover the pan and transfer to the oven to cook for 30 to 35 minutes until the sauce reduces.
  • Make the couscous according to the packet instructions – I always use chicken stock for added flavour.
  • Add the chopped basil leaves and serve.

 

 

 

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IMG_0309Ingredients

  • 6 medium sized tomatoes
  • 1 red chilli (with seeds if you like it hot)
  • ½ green pepper
  • ½ lime (juiced)
  • 1 tbsp. tomato puree
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • A handful of fresh coriander leaves
  • Sea salt

Method

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